An analysis of moll flanders by daniel defoe

This is especially true with regard to her many children, all of whom are farmed out or abandoned to a series of professional foster parents.

moll flanders as a social document

Moll rises from abject poverty and anonymity to wealth and security and it is interesting to speculate just how much her account would have provided hope for those from the dispossessed lower social order who were literate enough to read her story.

Instead she wanted to be a "gentlewoman," by which she understood making her living doing spinning and needlework.

It is no surprise that Moll seeks to make the best of a bad situation as often as she can. She was attractive and so vain about her appearance that she was easily convinced men were in love with her. Defoe creates a world in which people are commodities and social advancement depends on shrewd and calculated behaviour. In one sense, Moll is the product of a Puritan society turned to worldly zeal. Perhaps Defoe did intend to influence public opinion with regard to the issue of transportation, with this novel, intending it as a rhetorical statement or endorsement of transportation. Her abandonment of her offspring may have been , and indeed probably was, the only practical solution to ensure that they would have at least a slim chance of survival. She is lucky to be a charming child, thus gaining favor: perhaps it is better not to wonder about the fates of the ugly and charmless pauper children. Her immoral actions have no real consequences, and the narrative tends to excuse her behavior by referring it to material necessity. Buy Study Guide Preface: Summary Defoe hopes that Moll Flanders will be taken for what he says it is, a true history, despite the fact of its heroine's real name being concealed and the multitude of novels being published at the time. Defoe creates in Moll a character of limitless interest, in spite of her unconcealed ethical shortcomings. Her evolving theory was that if England had provided properly for orphans she would not have fallen into bad hands and thus needed to fend for herself before she could be trained to make her way honestly in the world. In fact Moll is often perverse and very acquisitive and in strict Puritan terms she is lost to God because of her false worship of wealth, power and success. Moll had only guineas now, and was in a difficult situation: she was not really a widow and could not remarry, but had no husband to support her. Fictional writing had been very stylised, but Defoe created a well - crafted, energetic prose style that owed much to his career as a journalist. This relationship continued for half a year.

The themes of the novel, in part, are transgression, repentance and redemption, which are to be expected, given Defoe's Dissenting background. Her husband wished her well and said she might not hear form him again; he escaped from jail to France.

moll flanders daniel defoe resumen

Originally its language had been "not fit to be read," as a result of Moll's debauched lifestyle. Throughout the novel we see Moll's dual nature — a penitent woman reproaching herself for her misdeeds, and a ruthless pursuer of ill-gotten wealth.

1722 daniel defoe novel

Again Moll was lucky to escape with a broken heart, and a profitable marriage. Perhaps Defoe did intend to influence public opinion with regard to the issue of transportation, with this novel, intending it as a rhetorical statement or endorsement of transportation.

Moll's second husband appears to be a nice fellow, with the good manners that Moll so approves of. Her immoral actions have no real consequences, and the narrative tends to excuse her behavior by referring it to material necessity. She is, however, careful to find homes for them. Moll resisted stubborn: she could not stand the idea of being "a whore to one brother, and a wife to the other. The elder brother began to meet Moll in private, kissing her and telling her he loved her. Then, luckily for her, she was transported to the Virginian plantations, leaving Moll in England. An eight-year old could be made to work all day as a powerless "drudge to some cookmaid," learning no useful skills and earning no more than a meager keep. The behavior of the debtors she encounters in the Mint has quite a different effect on her: whereas her attitude towards her spendthrift husband is one of annoyed tolerance, she is sincerely horrified by these. There he promised again to marry her, and also to give her guineas every year till then. Defoe creates a world in which people are commodities and social advancement depends on shrewd and calculated behaviour. Unfortunately when she was a little over fourteen, her nurse fell sick and died.
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Moll Flanders Analysis